3.4% of London residents cycle five times every week (DfT). 34% of London residents use public transport every day (LSE). In Ealing, this computes as 11,600 cyclists and 116,00 public transport users. In heavily built-up areas Transport for London (TfL) and Ealing  Council seem determined to spend £millions on segregated cycle lanes whose existence in many places degrades public bus services.  Ealing Council in 2018 announced that the increase in cycling use from 2013/14 to 2016/17 was a modest 2.4%. We review the projected cycling-driven £19 million spend along and alongside the W5/W13 Uxbridge Road traverse (TfL’s Liveable Neighbourhoods).

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  • To be fair to this scheme, one shouldn’t base their calculations on the *existing* numbers. A lot of people do not use a bike and use public transport simply because better conditions for cycling do not exist *yet*.
    It’s more of a case of “If you build it, they will come” 🙂
    Imagine if we used that reasoning when trying to see if a public transport system was necessary…

    • As a local cyclist, I am confounded by these half baked expensive policies.
      It is really easy to cycle round Ealing, Brentford and Hanwell avoiding all the busy roads.Using Boston Manor Road southbound is nuts and very few use it.
      It’s not helped either by the legion of ‘serious’ cyclists who insist on cycling two abreast filling the width, have no bells but somehow always a camera. Presumably they delete their breaking of road etiquette and they abuse they hurl at slower cyclists on their ‘cheap’ crap bikes…like mine!
      But all theses are not maintained. Currently BM road is like an ice rink with months old leave now a slippy slush.
      The same can be said for most of Ealings Back routes and designated routes.

      As for damaging public transport routes for what will always be a minority who will, one day, whether 40, 50 or 70 no longer be able to cycle is not far short of criminally insane.

      A huge waste of money when there are such better ways of cycling safely. All you need is a bit of sense and half a brain.

    • The logic behind your reasoning escapes me. The public transport system running along Broadway W13/W5 is one of the best in the world. 6 different route services and TfL’s own figures show 500 journeys during morning and evening ‘Rush Hours’.

      ‘Build it they will come’? Not on Boston Manor Road or along Ruislip Road East so far as my eyes can tell.

      • My logic is always perfectly sound, thank you very much. 😉 (just kidding)
        I was just deconstructing the flaw in the original reasoning.
        I never said that “if you build it, they will come” will work, I am just outlining what i think the strategy of the local authority might be to find other ways of transportation than the car. I never said they were doing a great job at it or that it would be automatically successful. 😉
        I was just saying that using “current usage” stats is a very flawed method to make or criticise decisions for a future project.
        I am not a biker so I can’t possibly comment on the quality of the existing roads. But from my pedestrian and driver standpoint, I am not inclined to use a bike anywhere in London in the current circumstances (Ken had a great point in showing that from his experience.) but could be convinced if these conditions would improve.
        🙂

        • Thanks for this.

          The fastest growing demographic group are almost certainly the elderly. Cycling is not for them. Buses are for them as is carriage by private vehicles, Ubers, taxis and mini-cabs.

          It will be interesting to watch whether the existence of the cycle lanes at Ruislip Road East and Boston Manor Road actually encourages greater use by cyclists. If it doesn’t then the £1 million or so cost will have been wasted.

          I am exasperated by the plans to spend £millions on segregated cycling on the Uxbridge Road and not to spend money creating segregated pick-up and drop-off areas immediately outside the five new Elizabeth Line Stations.

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